Famous Quotes of Benjamin Disraeli

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Benjamin Disraeli
Benjamin Disraeli

Benjamin Disraeli was the British statesman who served as Prime Minister twice. As Prime Minister, Disraeli was the first and only one to be of Jewish ancestry to date. He stood out as an unlikely statesman because his family was not aristocratic nor did he possess an elite education. Nevertheless, Disraeli left an indelible mark as a politician. Aside from politics though, he was also a novelist who published fiction and non-fiction works. He was born on December 21, 1904 and passed away on April 19, 1881. His favourite flower was the primrose and his death anniversary is celebrated as Primrose Day.

1. ‘where knowledge ends, religion begins.’

This quotation is sourced as a remark, attributed in a book by John Gordon Stewart Drysdale and John James Drysdale titled, The Protoplasmic Theory of Life (1874). When a problem cannot be solved logically, faith ‘ on which religion is based ‘ serves as a source of solace.

2. ‘to be conscious that you are ignorant of the facts is a great step to knowledge.’

This quotation is taken from Disraeli’s book, Sybil (1845), book 1, chapter 5. To be humble, as opposed to arrogant, is more conducive to becoming knowledgeable.

3. ‘I never deny; I never contradict; I sometimes forget.’

this quotation is a comment Disraeli made to Lord Escher after having spoken to the queen. Whereas denial and contradiction can be done consciously, forgetfulness is usually done unconsciously, unless the person is intentionally sly.

4. ‘the greatest good you can do for another is not just share your riches, but to revel to him his own.’

UNSOURCED VIA WIKIQUOTE. Better than exercising power over someone, is empowering someone to realize they possess their own riches!

5. ‘nothing is going on, but everybody is afraid of something.’

this quotation is taken from Disraeli’s book, Endymion (1880), chapter 2. Fear is omnipresent and inescapable. We can do our best to repress our fears, but they are still within us.

6. ‘the more you are talked about, the less powerful you are.’

This quotation is taken from Disraeli’s book, Endymion (1880), chapter 36. Power is the ability to do as you please without having people react.

7. ‘what is crime among the multitude is only vice among the few.’

This quotation is taken from Disraeli’s book, Tancred (1847), chapter 7. Location will dictate what is considered crime and what is considered vice.

8. ‘time is the great physician.’

This quotation is taken from Disraeli’s book, Henrietta Temple (1838), book 6, chapter 9. Time is free and time will not talk back to you about your feelings!

9. ‘a consistent man believes in destiny, a capricious man in chance.’

This quotation is taken from Disraeli’s book, Vivian Grey (1826), book VI, chapter 22. Life being somewhat unpredictable in my eyes, I am drawn to the capricious man’s perspective. But to each, his own!

10. ‘time is precious, but truth is more precious than time.’

This quotation is taken from a speech that Disraeli gave in Aylesbury, for the Royal and Central Bucks Agricultural Association on September 21, 1865. A waste of time is not nearly as cruel as the betrayal of someone’s trust.

11. ‘experience is the child of thought, and thought is the child of action. we cannot learn men from books.’

This quotation is taken from Disraeli’s book, Vivian Grey (1826), book chapter 1. Do not be so quick to believe what is written in books. Believe more in what you experience first hand.

12. ‘it is easier to be critical than correct’

This quotation is taken from a speech Disraeli gave in the House of Commons on January 24, 1860. Our desire to be correct compels us to criticize others, even though it appears they are indeed correct.

13. ‘never apologize for showing feeling. when you do so, you apologize for truth.’

This quotation is taken from Disraeli’s book, Contarini Fleming (1832), part 1, chapter 13. Feeling is what separates humans from animals. Why must we apologize for showing our true nature?

14. ‘freedom is, in one word, liberty: a kind of thing which you foreigners never can understand, and which mere theory can make no man understand. when you have been in the island a few weeks all will be quite clear to you. in the meantime, do as others do, and never knock men down!”

This quotation is taken from Disraeli’s book, The Voyage of Captain Popanilla (1827), chapter 6. Freedom is dependent on where one finds them self. Observe and then follow in their stead.

15. ‘when men are pure, laws are useless; when men are corrupt, laws are broken.’

This quotation is taken from Disraeli’s book, Contarini Fleming (1832), part 6, chapter 3. Men and laws necessitate and negate each other’s existence.

16. ‘that lofty-minded man, who spoke so eloquently and so wisely, was he a roué, an eccentric roué; one whose unprincipled conduct could only be excused at the expense of the soundness of his intellect?’

This quotation is taken from Disraeli’s book, Sketches, chapter 6. An intellectual’s conduct may be dismissed as eccentric but the conduct of an ignoramus will not be treated so lightly.

17. ‘desperation is sometimes as powerful an inspirer as genius.’

This quotation is taken from Disraeli’s book, Endymion (1880), chapter 8. Genius is on equal footing with desperation, especially if desperation precipitates creativity.

18. ‘there is no wisdom like frankness.’

This quotation is taken from Disraeli’s book, Sybil (1845). Wisdom ceases to exist when individuals are more concerned with pleasing each other.

 

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