Famous INFP People

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‘INFP’ is an acronym for ‘introversion, intuition, feeling and perception.’ The letter ‘N’ denotes ‘intuition’ instead of ‘I’ which stands for ‘introversion.’ INFP is a type out of the 16 types of people indicated in the Meyers”œBriggs Type Indicator, MBTI. It was developed from the renowned psychiatrist Carl G. Jung’s book Psychological Types. Jung’s types are like the left-handed or right-handed persons who are either born with a certain capability or develop that capability through experience and personal preferences. According to the MBTI, people belong to any one of the 16 personality types. Not scientifically precise, though, it is generally accepted that around 4% of the world’s population is comprised of INFPs. They are focused towards exploring the objective of life from within and try to achieve it in all its completeness. They are idealists and perfectionists; therefore, they are not easily satisfied with their achievements. More than their senses, they trust their intuition, and relying upon it do not hesitate to act accordingly.

1. Jane Goodall

Jane Goodall
Jane Goodall

Jane Goodall was born to Mortimer Herbert Morris-Goodall and Margaret Myfanwe Joseph in London, England on April 3, 1934. She was educated at Darwin College, University of Cambridge. She is a famous primatologist and UN Messenger of Peace. She is best known for her 45 years study of wild chimpanzees in the Gombe Stream National Park. She founded the Jane Goodall Institute and has worked tirelessly for the conservation and welfare of animals. She is considered the number one authority in the world on chimpanzees. Her belonging to the INFP type is reflected in that her father gave her a chimpanzee toy in her childhood, and she made it her objective in life to help chimpanzees. It is also reflected in her move to name rather than the conventional numbering of chimpanzees. A few of the chimpanzees she named include: David Greybeard, Goliath, Mike, Humphrey, Gigi, Flo, and Frodo. Like a typical INFP, she was concerned more about feelings as she said, ‘The only way is to get into people’s hearts. It’s the only way. It doesn’t work through the head.’ She had been honored with literally numerous awards, and one is that she is Dame of the British Empire, DBE.

2. William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare was born to John Shakespeare and Mary Arden in Stratford-Upon-Avon, Warwickshire, England on April 26, 1564 and died at the same place on April 23, 1616 at the age of 52. He is acknowledged as the greatest writer in the English language throughout the world. His surviving works include 38 plays and 154 sonnets. His plays have been translated in almost all the living languages and have been played more than any other plays in history. Many of his plays were published in his lifetime. The First Folio, which contained most of his plays, was published in 1623. That he belonged to INFPs is self-evident from his written works.

3. Vincent van Gogh

Vincent van Gogh
Vincent van Gogh

Vincent van Gogh was born to Theodorus Van Gogh and Anna Cornelia Carbentus in Zundert, Netherlands on March 30, 1853 and died in Auvers-Sur-Oise, France on July 29, 1890 at the age of 37. He is best known for his post-Impressionist works. In his field of painting he was unrivaled and left indelible imprints in history through his marvelous paintings including; ‘Starry Night,’ ‘Sunflowers,’ ‘Bedroom in Arles,’ ‘Portrait of Dr. Gachet,’ ‘Self Portrait,’ and ‘Sorrow.’ He produced more than 2,100 works including 860 oil paintings and 1,300 water colors, drawings and sketches. His works relating to portraits, sunflowers, and wheat fields are famous for their wild beauty, touching honesty, and bold colors.

4. Hans Christian Andersen

 Hans Christian Andersen
Hans Christian Andersen

Hans Christian Andersen was born in Odense, Denmark on April 2, 1805 and died in Copenhagen, Denmark on August 4, 1875 at the age of 70 years. He was a Danish author best known for his fairy tales written for children and not excluding the others, they include: The Snow Queen, The Little Mermaid, Princess and the Pea, The Ugly Duckling, The Steadfast Tin Soldier, Thumbelina, Little Match Girl, and The Emperor’s New Clothes. His tales have been translated into 150 languages, and his classics have earned him worldwide, lasting fame. He was born in slums, and perhaps the first-rate experience of being poor had been his inspiration too as he said, ‘If you looked down to the bottom of my soul, you would understand fully the source of my longing and pity me.’

5. John Kerry

John Kerry
John Kerry

John Kerry was born to Richard Kerry and Rosemary Forbes Kerry in Aurora, Colorado on December 11, 1943. He is the tenth senior most U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, and he is also the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. In 2004, he was the presidential nominee of the Democratic Party, but he lost to President George Bush. He was a Vietnam Veteran, and when asked why he threw his Vietnam War medals into the river, he said ”¦start a war’¦The USA should only go to war because we have to. And if you live by that guidance, you’ll never have veterans throwing away their medals or standing up in protest.’

6.  Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf
Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf was born to Sir Leslie Stephen and Julia Prinsep Stephen in Kensington, London, England on January 25, 1882 and died in River Ouse, East Sussex, England on March 28, 1941 at the age of 59 years. She was a famous English writer, and she is best known for her novels including: Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, and Orlando. She knew that her intuition overpowered her mental thoughts and once she said, ‘My own brain is to me the most unaccountable of machinery – always buzzing, humming, soaring, roaring, diving, and then buried in mud. And why? What’s this passion for?’

7. Augustine

St. Augustine the Blessed
St. Augustine the Blessed

Augustine was born to Patricius and Monica in Thagaste, Numida, Algeria on November 13, 354 and died in Hippo Requis, Numidia, Algeria. He was a famous theologian and philosopher of the Roman Empire and is regarded as the greatest Christian philosopher of all times. Augustine developed the concept of a spiritual City of God distinguished from the material, Earthly City. He is also known as St. Augustine the Blessed. He believed in that the true freedom is in the slavery of the goodness as he said, ‘The good man, though a slave, is free; the wicked, though he reigns, is a slave, and not the slave of a single man, but – what is worse – the slave of as many masters as he has vices.’

8. Thomas S. Kuhn

Thomas S. Kuhn
Thomas S. Kuhn

Thomas S. Kuhn was born to Samuel L. Kuhn and Minette Strook Kuhn in Cincinnati, Ohio on July 18, 1922 and died in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S. on June 17, 1996 at the age of 73 years. He became famous after publication of his controversial work The Structure of Scientific Revolutions in which he used the term ‘paradigm shift’ for the first time and which soon became a household term in the English language. Kuhn opined that ‘the scientific fields undergo periodic paradigm shifts, rather than solely progressing in a linear, continuous way.’

9. Homer

Homer
Homer

Homer is considered the greatest ancient Greek epic poet. He is best known for his great works Iliad and Odyssey. These works had a great influence on the history of literature. Researchers consider that he lived in the 7th or 8th century BC. Aristotle in his Poetics remarked that Homer was unique in his time. Mathew Arnold wrote about Homer’s style ”¦translator of Homer should above all be penetrated by a sense of four qualities of his author”that he is eminently rapid; that he is eminently plain and direct,’¦both in his syntax and in his words; that he is eminently plain and direct in the substance of his thought’¦he is eminently noble.’

10. Sylvia Plath

Sylvia Plath
Sylvia Plath

Sylvia Plath was born to Aurelia Schober Plath and Otto Plath in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S. on October 27, 1932 and died in London, England on February 11, 1963 at the age of 30 years. She was educated at Smith College and Newnham College, Cambridge. She is best known for her Pultizer Prize winning The Colossus and Other Poems. She is also the author of the semi-autobiographical novel, The Bell Jar. Suffering from severe depression, she committed suicide in 1963.

Conclusion:

INFPs are very sincere, highly capable, and imaginative people, sometimes appearing evasive, dramatic, and dependent. They may not be very competent with verbal communication, but when it comes to writing, they are simply matchless. INFPs had been people of high renown in the past leaving undeleted imprints on the pages of history. They are contributing towards the betterment of mankind in these current times and have the potential to make planet Earth a much better place to live in the future.

 

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